Asymmetrical features associated with anger

Don’t anger the asymmetric

After you read this piece, you will probably break out the measuring tape and try to figure out how prone to anger you are, because recent research indicates that anger can be measured in inches.

Using a clever ruse, researchers at Ohio State University found in 2004 that the more asymmetrical a person is in some physical features, the more likely that person is to become angry at rejection. In addition, the scientists found a role for testosterone and sex in these responses.

They duped 51 men and 49 women into thinking that they were attempting to raise money for a (false) charity. Participants had to make two phone calls in an effort to obtain a donation and expected to receive a reward if they were successful. Instead of the person on the other end of the phone being someone in the middle of his dinner, it was really a researcher, pretending to be a solicitee. At the first phone call, the solicitee pretended to be sympathetic, but politely said that he or she had no money to give. For the second phone call, the responder behaved rudely, saying the donation would be a waste of money. The first response was considered a low-provocation incident, and the second a high-provocation response.

Who hangs up phones any more?

When the unknowing study participants hung up the phone, the force of their hang-up was measured, as were their testosterone levels. Additionally, after the exercise, they had a choice of three letters to send to the people they had called; one letter was polite, one moderately pleasant, and the third accusatory and angry.

After collecting data on the ankles, foot width, ear height and width, palms, wrists, and fingers of the participants, the researchers looked for correlations between asymmetry of these characteristics and an angry response, as measured by the force of the telephone hang-up. They found that asymmetrical people became angrier and slammed the receiver more than symmetrical people. In addition, asymmetrical men hung up with more force under the low-provocation scenario, and asymmetrical women hung up with more force after confronting the rude responder.

Oh, testosterone and anger again?

Testosterone levels also played a role, with higher levels causing a more pronounced anger response, and again, the response showed a sex-bias. High-testosterone men were more likely to hang up forcefully after the low-provocation incident, and high-testosterone women after the high-provocation scenario.

What does it all mean? Are the asymmetric people sensitive to rejection, and thus, easily angered by it? Perhaps. But the researchers hypothesize that stress during embryonic development disrupts the embryo on several levels, from physical symmetry to neuronal connections. Scientists have long thought that shifts from symmetry during embryonic development—for example, the right-hand fingers developing a greater length than the left-hand fingers—occur because stressors send developmental signals awry. If the signals operate and are received correctly, both sides should develop the same way; but cigarette smoke, alcohol, and other stressors can disrupt these signals, and asymmetry—and quick anger—can be the result.

Testosterone and asymmetry

One intriguing finding of the study was that the asymmetry results reflected the testosterone levels of the participants. This outcome brings questions of the relationships among the hormonal parameters of development, their disruption, and later manifestations of these interactions.

If you’re wondering why men got so angry with the polite responder and women more so with the rude responder, here’s the researchers’ explanation: Men are quick to react with anger, but are not as comfortable as women with high-anxiety situations. So, when the tension amps up, men back off, but women may actually become more aggressive.

And those letters? More than a third of the participants wanted to send the rudest letter, regardless of their sex or levels of symmetry or testosterone. Perhaps they were merely foreshadowing the anger that now pervades American politics today.

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About ejwillingham
Sciwriter/editor/autism-ADHD parent. SciMaven @ http://doublexscience.blogspot.com/. I speak my pieces @ http://daisymayfattypants.blogspot.com/ & @ http://thebiologyfiles.blogspot.com/

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