Termite toots causing global warming?

Termites to blame for global warming?

I was, um, in the bathroom at the Denver Zoo listening to the info feed the nice woman with the colonial accent was providing for folks using the facilities. The facts are all about poop and related activities, which I suppose is appropriate to the moment at hand. To add to the excretory atmosphere, the stall doors bear representations of animal hindquarters. Just letting you know that in case you ever want to stare at a close-up view of a baboon’s rear while you’re micturating. At any rate, as I was washing my hands, I heard a little tidbit about termites and greenhouse gases. The pleasant voice informed me that termites contribute a good percentage of the world’s greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, in the form of methane. Tooty little buggers, they must be.

It’s true. More methane than cows

Like most animals that survive on cellulose-based diets, termites have friendly micro-organisms that help them break down normally undigestible macromolecules. In the process, the micro-organisms produce a lot of methane gas. That gas, whether it’s in a cow or a termite, has to go somewhere, and that somewhere is out. Contrary to what some people may think, and according to the pleasant voice at the Denver Zoo, termites expel more of this stuff than cows do.

Should we blame the bacteria instead?

Actually, the helpful gut micro-organisms in termites are not all bacteria. Some are protozoans, depending on the termite species. But they’d be nothing without their hosts, so I guess we can just go ahead and blame them both. And I blame the Denver Zoo and their scatalogically oriented bathroom experience for the existence of this particular blog post.

Should we kill all the termites?

Well, that’s a terrible idea for any number of reasons, but as it turns out, it’s also not gonna help. One of the primary poisons used to knock of the wood-chewing insects happens also to be a “powerful greenhouse gas.” In addition, termites serve as a model for efficient harvesting of energy from biofuels, pulling about 90% from what they take in, compared to humanity’s sadly low success rates. So, yes, they eat our houses and expel about 15% of the methane in the atmosphere, but…they’re still better than we are at efficiently extracting energy from what they take in.

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About ejwillingham
Sciwriter/editor/autism-ADHD parent. SciMaven @ http://doublexscience.blogspot.com/. I speak my pieces @ http://daisymayfattypants.blogspot.com/ & @ http://thebiologyfiles.blogspot.com/

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