NPR’s Asperger’s FAIL

NPR’s “All Things Considered” ran a piece today on the difficulties in defining “mental disorders.” Based on what is posted on their site regarding the piece, they essentially report the opinion of one man, Allen Frances, who has taken it upon himself to do two selfish things. The first is that he blames himself for what he calls the “Asperger’s epidemic.” The second is that he felt compelled to discuss some unfounded–or at least, unsupported–assumptions about Asperger’s diagnoses on NPR.

Frances, former chief of psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center, was the editor of the previous edition of the “mental disorders” bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. We’re coming up on the fifth version of this hefty tome. From my personal experience, by the time it comes out, research will be about five years ahead of much of what it contains. But never mind that. Frances’ issue with IV was that it contained Asperger’s as a diagnostic category (he has other issues not addressed in the NPR piece). He describes having acquiesced in its inclusion based on needs expressed by professionals who were seeing children with autism-like behaviors that weren’t as severe as the disorder known as autism.

Now he regrets that. Why? Because so many children are now being diagnosed with Asperger’s. As the parent of a child with autism, as the friend of many families with parents or children with autism, as the acquaintance of many grown people with autism–including Asperger’s–I can say that many of us would perceive that increase as a good thing. Why? Because that means more people with autism are able to recognize what makes them tick, and it helps them to know that yes, in a world where many of us feel like Temple Grandin’s aptly described “anthropologist on Mars,” there are a lot of other like-minded anthropologists out there.

That’s not Frances’ take. Based on a study done at the time IV was formulated, Asperger’s was “vanishingly rare.” That’s not too shocking given that for most professionals, it didn’t exist yet. The explanation that he offers for the increase in Asperger’s cases isn’t that there is now a diagnostic category for it, but that people–parents, presumably–seek the diagnosis so that their children can get services at school. This part is worth quoting from the piece:

“And so kids who previously might have been considered on the boundary, eccentric, socially shy, but bright and doing well in school would mainstream [into] regular classes,” Frances says. “Now if they get the diagnosis of Asperger’s disorder, [they] get into a special program where they may get $50,000 a year worth of educational services.”

The clear inference to draw from this is that there are hundreds of medical professionals out there deliberately stretching the diagnostic checklist for Asperger’s to cover children who are “doing well in school” and who are “socially shy” (what other kind of shy is there?). I have a few problems with this scenario.

First, if your child is doing well in school, you don’t get services. Services are for academic support. Period. There aren’t “special programs.” A child may have academic supports from almost nothing to a full-time aide in an integrated classroom to exclusion in a resource classroom. There is no one “special program.” That’s one reason they call those things INDIVIDUAL education plans. Regardless, if you’re doing well academically, you don’t get these supports. If you have speech or motor deficits, you receive appropriate therapies. But the deficits have to be there–they’re not something you just make up.

Second, if your child is doing well in school, parents and schools and medical professionals don’t generally go looking for a label to slap on the child. Parents seek help because their child has a problem or problems. The gold standard for calling something a disorder is if it interferes regularly with the general processes of daily life. Doing well in school but being “shy” doesn’t meet that standard. With autism, with Asperger’s, we’re talking about debilitating, meltdown-inducing, terror-filling anxiety. There is a difference.

Third, I don’t have a clue where he got the monetary value from, and NPR provides no balance for that statement. It’s just sitting there, making any family with a child receiving any services look like a faking money suck. Nice.

The piece as presented on the NPR Website provides nothing in the way of confirmation from objective sources. No studies indicating overdiagnosis. No input from experts in autism confirming what Frances says. His off-the-cuff commentary, his self blame, his stirring the pot all just sit there, unchallenged. Even the apparent effort at “balance” at the end of the story is almost a non-sequitur, part of a story with no real core. It’s as though they can’t make up their minds about whether the piece is about difficulties of diagnosis in general, the blurred lines between disorder and merely discombobulated, or that Asperger’s in particular is an overdiagnosed condition.

They don’t even provide Frances’ qualifications to speak to autism in particular. Not all doctors are oncologists, and not all psychiatrists have a deep understanding of developmental disorders.

All in all, a shoddy presentation that is already making its way around the Twitterverse, with parents once again feeling as though they have to defend their child’s diagnosis of a developmental difference that often goes unseen. Here’s the deal: The diagnostic criteria are clear, and a child who’s merely eccentric and doing well in school does not fit those criteria. If there is some modicum of overdiagnosis, it’s certainly not because of parents overseeking a label so they can have their child be stigmatized at school by receiving services. Look to the diagnosticians to blame. Or, in the complete absence of any evidence from Frances himself or NPR, do what Frances asks and blame him. Given his focus on his regrets over IV, he clearly seems to have something to expiate. And so does NPR. I’ll turn to D.H. Lawrence and say that thing is…a pettiness.

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About ejwillingham
Sciwriter/editor/autism-ADHD parent. SciMaven @ http://doublexscience.blogspot.com/. I speak my pieces @ http://daisymayfattypants.blogspot.com/ & @ http://thebiologyfiles.blogspot.com/

4 Responses to NPR’s Asperger’s FAIL

  1. Michael G. says:

    What a wonderful retort. You should send him a letter, as you are able to so brilliantly articulate the thoughts and feelings of many. France’s views seem completely insensitive, and he should be pulled up on it.

  2. Pingback: Tweets that mention NPR’s Asperger’s FAIL « The Biology Files -- Topsy.com

  3. Pingback: Allen Frances gave us the Asperger’s “epidemic.” Just like Al Gore gave us the Internet | Kitaiska Sandwich

  4. Pingback: Allen Frances gave us the Asperger’s “epidemic” — just like Al Gore gave us the Internet | Neurodiversity

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